Nutrition Program

 
DO I QUALIFY FOR HOME-DELIVERED MEALS?
 
Home-delivered meal service, sometimes known as Meals on Wheels, helps sick or homebound older Tennesseans get a hot, nutritionally balanced home-delivered meal. These prepared meals can be hot and ready to eat or can be meals to be stored and heated later for consumption. Meals are typically delivered Monday–Friday by volunteers.

In addition to the nutrition support that these meals provide, the meal-delivery person provides a friendly visit and a safety check. For some older adults, this may be the only person they see that day.

Meals are available to eligible homebound or frail consumers. Several programs provide home-delivered meals (if needed) as part of their services, including CHOICES and OPTIONS. Eligibility is assessed via a phone screening. To determine if you are eligible, contact the FTAAAD Information and Assistance line at 1-866-836-6678 and request a screening for home-delivered meals.

Self-pay home-delivered meals are an option for those individuals who do not meet the income and/or health requirements of the CHOICES or OPTIONS programs. This is a good option for out-of-state family members who cannot be on hand to provide caregiver support, but want to ensure that their loved one is receiving nutritious meals and a wellness check every day. Some churches also fund home-delivered meals for homebound parishioners. If you need information about self-pay home-delivered meals, contact the FTAAAD Information and Assistance line at 1-866-836-6678.

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WHAT ARE CONGREGATE MEALS?
 
Congregate meals are meals served in group settings to people who are at least 60 years of age. Meals are served five to seven days a week, except on holidays. The meals are healthy and designed to meet the nutritional needs of adults 60 and over. These healthy, tasty meals are served at over 215 senior centers, community centers, and other locations across the state.
All income levels are welcome, but these meal programs often serve the neediest older adults. Anyone at least 60 years old and his or her spouse can receive meals. Some programs also serve younger people who have disabilities. No one over age 60 is turned away.
There are no set fees for meals, but people are encouraged to make a small donation. The suggested donation amount may vary, but it is always low-cost.

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WHERE CAN I FIND A CONGREGATE MEAL SITE?

 
Congregate meal locations administered by FTAAAD are generally found at senior centers or senior housing. Other community organizations also host congregate meals as well, often at churches or community centers.
To view a list of FTAAAD meal sites by county, CLICK HERE.
To view a map of emergency food resources throughout Northeast Tennessee, visit the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Tennessee's interactive map, LOCATED HERE.
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APPLY FOR SNAP OR LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR  SNAP BENEFITS
 
The SNAP program has special eligibility criteria for older adults, which means that many seniors may be eligible for SNAP benefits but are not utilizing them. To make it easier for older adults to apply for SNAP, FTAAAD has a SNAP outreach coordinator who can complete an application with you over the phone or in person. To apply, or learn more about this important nutrition program, call 423-722-5093.
To learn more about how SNAP works, CLICK HERE.
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HOW CAN I LEARN ABOUT EATING HEALTHIER MEALS?
 
A nutritional counselor helps clients develop healthy eating habits. They also develop customized diets and eating programs for those who have special dietary such as diabetes, high blood pressure, low salt and sugar.
If you are enrolled in the home-delivered-meal program, or participate in congregate meals at one of the FTAAAD nutrition sites and wish to receive free phone-based nutrition counseling from an ETSU dietician, please contact your FTAAAD OPTIONS counselor or the senior center meal site coordinator for more information.
Other older adults can request nutritional counseling from their health insurance provider, their doctor, or their county health department. Ballad Health's Health Resources Centers in Johnson City and Kingsport also provide nutrition assistance and education.
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OTHER COMMUNITY RESOURCES
 
Food insecurity in Northeast Tennessee affects all age groups, but there are many resources available to help combat hunger, provide nutrition education, and respond to short-term emergencies. To learn about these resources, contact the FTAAAD Information & Assistance line at 1-866-836-6678.
If you know an older or disabled adult  who is food insecure due to an inability to manage their financial resources, unable to carry out activities of daily living, unable to protect themselves from neglect (including self-neglect), or being unable to avoid hazardous or abusive situations, then it is your legal obligation to notify Adult Protective Services (APS) so they can be evaluated and assisted. Notification may be done anonymously through the state call center (1-888-277-8366) or online at https://reportadultabuse.dhs.tn.gov.
To view a map of emergency food resources throughout Northeast Tennessee, visit the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Tennessee's interactive map, LOCATED HERE.
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